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Reproductive skew affects social information use
Univ Penn, Dept Biol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA;Univ Manchester, Fac Sci & Engn, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6367-8765
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Univ Manchester, Fac Sci & Engn, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.
Univ Manchester, Fac Sci & Engn, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
Univ Manchester, Fac Sci & Engn, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
2019 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 7, article id 182084Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individuals vary in their propensity to use social learning, the engine of cultural evolution, to acquire information about their environment. The causes of those differences, however, remain largely unclear. Using an agent-based model, we tested the hypothesis that as a result of reproductive skew differences in energetic requirements for reproduction affect the value of social information. We found that social learning is associated with lower variance in yield and is more likely to evolve in risk-averse low-skew populations than in high-skew populations. Reproductive skew may also result in sex differences in social information use, as empirical data suggest that females are often more risk-averse than males. To explore how risk may affect sex differences in learning strategies, we simulated learning in sexually reproducing populations where one sex experiences more reproductive skew than the other. When both sexes compete for the same resources, they tend to adopt extreme strategies: the sex with greater reproductive skew approaches pure individual learning and the other approaches pure social learning. These results provide insight into the conditions that promote individual and species level variation in social learning and so may affect cultural evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC , 2019. Vol. 6, no 7, article id 182084
Keywords [en]
cultural evolution, reproductive skew, social learning, competition, agent-based model
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393634DOI: 10.1098/rsos.182084ISI: 000479146300016PubMedID: 31417699OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-393634DiVA, id: diva2:1354409
Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved

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