Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, p. 785-792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Methods: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years. Results: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Conclusions: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019. Vol. 76, p. 785-792
Keywords [en]
cardiovascular, diabetes mellitus, mental health, meta-analysis, stress
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health General Practice
Research subject
Individual and Society VIDSOC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17718DOI: 10.1136/oemed-2018-105595ISI: 000497712200002PubMedID: 31488605Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85072081458OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-17718DiVA, id: diva2:1353519
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(777 kB)16 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 777 kBChecksum SHA-512
d625ce38d721006426717b4adf9195353d47e54d486bdd16112339d37d102e49cfccc83a70d665eaf9523a7b85915653c197b85f7a36e63017a947ae015987d8
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Suominen, Sakari
By organisation
School of Health and EducationHealth and Education
In the same journal
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyOccupational Health and Environmental HealthGeneral Practice

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 16 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 97 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf