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FROM PROJECT TO POLICY: IMPLEMENTING A COLLABORATIVE PROCUREMENT STRATEGY IN A PUBLIC CLIENT ORGANIZATION
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2981-4185
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5608-5013
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual ARCOM Conference: 2-4 September 2019, Leeds, UK / [ed] Gorse, C and Neilson, C J, 2019, p. 750-759Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Following urbanization and higher sustainability goals, large and complex

infrastructure construction projects are becoming more common. New collaborative

contracting models are increasingly used to tackle this complexity and uncertainty. In

a public context, collaborative contracting may be seen as an international trend in

public policy, which is implemented in projects by public clients world-wide. Since a

few years, the Swedish Transport Administration recommends that a two-stage Early

Contractor Involvement should be used for very large and complex projects. This

paper analyses the implementation of this model in two sub-projects in a large

Swedish infrastructure project based on policy implementation literature. Altogether

24 interviews were performed in two rounds, capturing both early expectations and

experiences gained after the contracts had been signed. Participants expressed

positive attitudes to the new collaborative project practices. However, the

implementation process was characterized by ambiguity and many issues about

staffing, collaboration processes, target cost estimations, responsibilities and design

output were left to the projects to resolve. The study shows how conflicting policies

and high project-level autonomy combine to counteract organizational learning and

homogenization of practices in this field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 750-759
Keywords [en]
collaboration, procurement, policy, public clients, project partnering
National Category
Construction Management Public Administration Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259722OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-259722DiVA, id: diva2:1353247
Conference
Association of Researchers in Construction Management
Note

QC 20190923

Available from: 2019-09-21 Created: 2019-09-21 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(375 kB)23 downloads
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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