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Fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed bovine MFGM supplemented formula or standard formula with breast-fed infants as reference: a randomized controlled trial
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human milk delivers an array of bioactive components that safeguard infant growth and development and maintain healthy gut microbiota. Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biologically functional fraction of milk increasingly linked to beneficial outcomes in infants through protection from pathogens, modulation of the immune system and improved neurodevelopment. In the present study, we characterized the fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed a bovine MFGM supplemented experimental formula (EF) and compared to infants fed standard formula (SF) and a breast-fed reference group. The impact of MFGM on the fecal microbiome was moderate; however, the fecal metabolome of EF-fed infants showed a significant reduction of several metabolites including lactate, succinate, amino acids and their derivatives from that of infants fed SF. Introduction of weaning food with either human milk or infant formula reduces the distinct characteristics of breast-fed- or formula-fed-like infant fecal microbiome and metabolome profiles. Our findings support the hypothesis that higher levels of protein in infant formula and the lack of human milk oligosaccharides promote a shift toward amino acid fermentation in the gut. MFGM may play a role in shaping gut microbial activity and function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019. Vol. 9, article id 11589
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Pediatrics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162856DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-47953-4ISI: 000480384500005PubMedID: 31406230OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-162856DiVA, id: diva2:1349158
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved

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