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Impulsivity, risk gambling, and heavy episodic drinking among adolescents: A moderator analysis of psychological health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). (REGAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5661-1682
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). (REGAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3573-6301
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). (REGAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0013-2965
2019 (English)In: Addictive Behaviors Reports, ISSN 2352-8532, E-ISSN 2076-3387, Vol. 10, article id 100211Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Adolescence is associated with an increased inclination for risk behaviors, like gambling and heavy episodic drinking (HED). While impulsivity is a well-documented risk factor, the purpose of this study is to explore if there are variables modulating this association. The study examined the effects of impulsivity and psychological health on riskgambling andHED, and whetherpsychological healthfunctions as amoderator, i.e., protective factor. Methods: Data was extracted from the Stockholm School Survey, collected in 2014 and 2016 among students in the ninth grade of primary school (15–16years) and second grade of upper secondary school (17–18years) in Stockholm (n=21,886). Impulsivity, psychological problems, risk gambling, HED, and a number of sociodemographic control variables were measured using self-report data. The statistical method was binary logistic regression. Results: Results showed that risk gambling (3.4%) and HED (22.8%) were prevalent among Swedish pupils. Impulsivity and—to a weaker extent—psychological problems as well as several sociodemographic variables were risk factors for risk gambling and HED. Furthermore, psychological problems negatively moderated the association between impulsivity and HED among girls. Conclusions: This study supports evidence that impulsivity represents a risk factor for risk behaviors, and—contrary to the a priori hypothesis—indicates that the association between impulsivity and HED in female students might be attenuated by the presence of psychological problems. Prevention measures should particularly address adolescents exhibiting the mentioned risk factors and aim at reducing psychological problems, but not necessarily target the adolescents showing impulsivity and psychological problems simultaneously.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 10, article id 100211
Keywords [en]
Risk gambling, Heavy episodic drinking, Impulsivity, Psychological health, Adolescents
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology; Public Health Sciences; Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-171816DOI: 10.1016/j.abrep.2019.100211OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-171816DiVA, id: diva2:1343824
Projects
REGAPS
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07091
Note

To be published in the December 2019 issue (HK 2019-08-19)

Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved

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Kaltenegger, HelenaBrolin Låftman, SaraWennberg, Peter
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