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The Complexity of Food Provisioning Decisions by Mori Caregivers to Ensure the Happiness and Health of Their Children
Massey Univ, Coll Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Auckland 0632, New Zealand.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1572-3784
Massey Univ, Coll Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Auckland 0632, New Zealand.
Univ Otago, Dunedin Sch Med, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1226-1956
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity in children is a global health concern. In New Zealand, one in three school entrant children are overweight or obese. Mori, the indigenous people, are disproportionately represented among the lowest economic group and have a disproportionately high incidence of obesity. This study explored Mori parents' and caregivers' views of the relative importance of weight to health, and the facilitators and barriers to a healthy weight in children aged 6 months to 5 years. Using a grounded qualitative method, in-depth information was collected in focus groups with mostly urban parents and other caregivers. A general inductive thematic analysis (content driven) was used. Insufficient money was an overriding food provisioning factor, but cost interacted with the lack of time, the number of people to feed, their appetites, and allergies. Other factors included ideologies about healthy food, cultural values relating to food selection, serving, and eating, nutrition literacy, availability of food, cooking skills, and lack of help. Childhood obesity was not a priority concern for participants, though they supported interventions providing education on how to grow vegetables, how to plan and cook cheaper meals. Holistic interventions to reduce the negative effects of the economic and social determinants on child health more broadly were recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 11, no 5, article id 994
Keywords [en]
Indigenous, nutrition, childhood obesity, social determinants of health, Mori health
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389872DOI: 10.3390/nu11050994ISI: 000471021600054PubMedID: 31052332OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-389872DiVA, id: diva2:1339869
Available from: 2019-07-31 Created: 2019-07-31 Last updated: 2019-07-31Bibliographically approved

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