Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Examining barriers to phytoremediating heavy metal polluted soils in developing countries
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Heavy metal soil pollution from anthropogenic sources such as historical use of fertilizers, poor waste disposal, and spills from industries are a serious environmental problem. This can be especially damaging in developing countries where incentives are limited to remediate these soils, and some of the poorest regions are the most affected. Soil remediation can clean heavy metal polluted soil to a level that is sustainable for the environment and the organisms that inhabit it. Many conventional soil remediation techniques can be very expensive, and resource and energy intensive, making them poor choices for developing countries. However, phytoremediation, an emerging soil remediation technology, is much cheaper and less intensive by using the natural ability of certain plants to clean polluted soils. Although phytoremediation has been considered the best available technology for developing countries with heavy metal polluted soil, it is still being underutilized. In this thesis, through the examination of case studies from the U.S., several barriers are identified that are preventing further implementation of phytoremediation projects in developing countries. These barriers include, the difficulties for developing countries in recognising the scale of heavy metal pollution, a lack of enforcement of environmental legislation and standards, prohibitive costs of projects, problems with the effectiveness of phytoremediation as a soil remediation technology, and a lack of technological knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 42
Keywords [en]
Heavy Metals, Phytoremediation, Developing Countries
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36751OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-36751DiVA, id: diva2:1338855
Subject / course
Environmental Science MV1
Educational program
International Master's Programme in Ecotechnology and Sustainable Development NEKAA 120 higher education credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Note

2018-10-30

Available from: 2019-07-24 Created: 2019-07-24 Last updated: 2019-07-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1143 kB)10 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1143 kBChecksum SHA-512
218f9f4fc68b787d81db49c154085c8b4adcce091fe832f7231da20cc049b14d3eaa401a93cd2586be87f604d556e4c05b258b5ade9324598ab7895350df891d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Dyer, Mark
By organisation
Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 10 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf