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Crisis Communication Management: -A Case Study of Oxfam’s 2018 Credibility Crisis
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The growth of social media has set demands on organizations to be online and interact with

stakeholders, especially during a crisis. The public are no longer seen as passive receivers of

marketing messages. Previous studies have shown that the need for information increases

during a crisis. Social media can be a powerful tool if is used strategically. This case study

looks deeper into Oxfam’s 2018 Haiti sexual exploitation scandal, as an attempt to understand

how organizations communicate on social media during a crisis. By co-applying multimodal

critical discourse analysis (MCDA) and the social-mediated crisis communication (SMCC)

model, a broader understanding of how the crisis was handled can be developed. The data

consists of four Instagram posts that will be analyzed, drawing upon four multimodal

frameworks from Machin (2017): Iconography: the ‘hidden meanings’ of images; The meaning

of color in visual design; The meaning of typography; and Representation of social actors in

images. In order to obtain a broader picture of the strategies, key public and relationships, the

components of the SMCC model will be identified and presented for this case. The result of

this study shows that multiple response strategies have been used to communicate both tailored

messages and unified organizational messages. It is apparent that Oxfam did not have a clear

strategy and altered between apologizing, “blaming” individuals within the organization and

distancing themselves from the crisis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 59
Keywords [en]
Crisis communication, Social media, Social Mediated Crisis Communication
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75154OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-75154DiVA, id: diva2:1338023
Subject / course
Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-07-19 Created: 2019-07-19 Last updated: 2019-07-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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