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Hope and Technology: Other-Oriented Hope Related to Eye Gaze Technology for Children with Severe Disabilities
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2340-1451
Orebro Univ, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introducing advanced assistive technology such as eye gaze controlled computers can improve a persons quality of life and awaken hope for a childs future inclusion and opportunities in society. This article explores the meanings of parents and teachers other-oriented hope related to eye gaze technology for children with severe disabilities. A secondary analysis of six parents and five teachers interview transcripts was conducted in accordance with a phenomenological-hermeneutic research method. The eye gaze controlled computer creates new imaginations of a brighter future for the child, but also becomes a source for motivation and action in the present. The other-oriented hope occurs not just in the future; it is already there in the present and opens up new alternatives and possibilities to overcome the difficulties the child is encountering today. Both the present situation and the hope for the future influence each other, and both affect the motivation for using the technology. This emphasises the importance of clinicians giving people opportunities to express how they see the future and how technology could realise this hope.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI , 2019. Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1667
Keywords [en]
eye gaze control technology; technology; disabled children; self-help devices; phenomenological-hermeneutic
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158825DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16101667ISI: 000470967500001PubMedID: 31091645OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158825DiVA, id: diva2:1337688
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-11-07

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