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Planning for Slow Growth and Decline in Mid-Sized U.S. Cities
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesisAlternative title
Planering för svag tillväxt och nedgång i mellanstora städer i USA (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

While many major cities in the United States are once again gaining population, growing their economies, and attracting talent, many small and mid-sized cities are in decline. The reasons for this growing disparity are multi-faceted. A growing body of research has been exploring planning challenges in declining cities and towns. This body of research—often called “shrinking cities” and “urban shrinkage” research—is premised on the belief that many declining places will continue to shed population, jobs, and industries, and planning smartly for this decline is the only sensible path forward. So far, research in the U.S. has focused primarily on Northeast and Midwest cities where population and industrial decline has been the most severe. Less scholarship has studied places that have declined more slowly and more recently. This thesis examines the current trends impacting the decline of mid-sized cities in the Midwestern United States, focusing on four cities in the State of Illinois. It also explores whether these cities are ready to consider the possibility that population decline is not temporary and change their planning strategies accordingly. Finally, this thesis will introduce an emerging paradigm in contemporary urban planning practice that fuses growth and decline strategies, to prepare mid-sized cities for an uncertain demographic and economic future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Series
TRITA-ABE-MBT ; 19535
Keywords [en]
shrinking cities, urban shrinkage, urban decline, Illinois, ordinary cities, Midwest, shrinkage, path dependency, urban planning
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-254943OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-254943DiVA, id: diva2:1336647
Subject / course
Urban and Regional Planning
Educational program
Degree of Master - Sustainable Urban Planning and Design
Presentation
2019-06-07, 00:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved

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fulltext(1960 kB)39 downloads
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Output format
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