Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evaluating the biological relevance of disease consensus modules: An in silico study of IBD pathology using a bioinformatics approach
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Inflammatory bowel disease encompasses a variety of heterogeneous chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract, where Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the principal examples. The etiology of these, and many other complex human diseases, remain largely unknown and therefore pose relevant targets for novel research strategies. One such strategy is the in silico application of network theory derived methods to data sourced from publicly available repositories of e.g. gene expression data. Specifically, methods generating graphs of interconnected elements enriched by differentially expressed genes—disease modules—were inferred with data available through the Gene Expression Omnibus. Based on a previous method, the current project aimed to evaluate disease modules, combined from stand-alone inferential methods, in disease consensus modules: representing pathophenotypical motifs for the diseases of interest. The modules found to be significantly enriched by genome-wide association study inferred single-nucleotide polymorphisms, as validated using the Pathway Scoring Algorithm, were subsequently subjects for further analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-pathway enrichment, and literature searches. The results of this study adheres to previous findings relating to the employed method, but lack any novelty pertaining the diseases of interest. However, the results substantiate the preceding methods’ conclusion by including parameters that increase statistical validity. In addition, the study contributed to peripheral results concerning both the methodology of consensus module methods, and the elucidation of inflammatory bowel disease etiology and disease subtype differentiation, that pose interesting subjects for future investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 34
Keywords [en]
Bioinformatics, Disease module, Consensus module, Disease consensus module, Network medicine, Inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, Ulcerative colitis, S2B, NSC, Tetralith, MODifieR
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17412OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-17412DiVA, id: diva2:1336005
Subject / course
Bioscience
Educational program
Bioscience - Molecular Biodesign
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

JS19_Bioscience(2433 kB)18 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2433 kBChecksum SHA-512
675f646d814003143f3a953b6ad434f62043324612ca864c850373775975c0f223e61e61d6bcbac318dde7ee20b12359dc95f85a4d060f0139fe06f7bb8910bc
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Bioscience
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 18 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 96 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf