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Culture and Gender Appropriate Responses in Child Friendly Spaces: An Ecological Comparative Analysis of Guidelines and Manuals
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Children around the world suffer greatly due to conflicts. One of the most common interventions to support children affected by conflicts are Child Friendly Spaces (CFSs). Implemented within different cultural contexts, CFSs aim to be both culturally sensitive and contribute to gender equality, an interaction that can be complex. Previous research regarding CFSs is limited. As CFSs are commonly used in Humanitarian Action, further knowledge is central.This thesis aims to explore and compare how culture and gender appropriate responses in CFSs guidelines and manuals are expressed in order to gain an increased understanding of how these guidelines handle the interaction between gender norms in different cultures.In this study I discuss six CFSs guidelines and manuals by conducting comparative analysis and applying the Ecological Resilience Framework.The result suggests that culture and gender appropriate responses are central in all guidelines and manuals but emphasized in different ways. The participation of children, families and communities, as well as the adaption of activities, are all strategies aimed at cultural sensitivity. The result also entails that the equal inclusion of all children is a general gender appropriate approach. In addition, I claim that the main intervention, aiming to be both gender and culture appropriate, is separated groups between boys and girls. Finally, I argue that gender and culture may clash due to different perceptions of gender and culture appropriate responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Humanitarian Action, Child Protection, Social Work, Conflict, Child, Child Friendly Spaces, Safe Spaces, Culture Appropriate, Gender Appropriate, Ecological Resilience, Sweden, Sudan, the Philippines, UNICEF, Rädda Barnen, Save the Children, World Vision, Red Cross & Red Crescent
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388655OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-388655DiVA, id: diva2:1334532
Subject / course
International Humanitarian Action
Educational program
Master Programme in Humanitarian Action and Conflict
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-07-23 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-07-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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