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Seaweed is Sexy: The consumption and utilisation of seaweed throughout British history and the marketing that surrounds it
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. (Global Environmental History)
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Damp, rotting, smelly, rising from the depths, washed up on shorelines. Seaweed (or Macroalgae) has transitioned over time in its position and uses within the British Isles; as discussed in the thesis it has undergone an evolution from its historical use as a source of food in times of desperation, to the superfood it is lauded as today. Other applications, from medicinal to agricultural, have contributed to a narrative of seaweed’s identity over the centuries, to the appeal of seaweed as a food source in the present day. There is an increased interest in seaweed, especially for culinary purposes, in the British Isles. Research by chefs, cookbooks and innovative product ranges also frame the current attitudes in the use of seaweed in common everyday foods. The case study shows the challenges and opportunities in the current revitalised seaweed market, identifying marketing analysis approaches useful for changing the attitudes toward seaweed in the British Isles. Based on interviews with companies marketing seaweed, and a focus on Seagreens®, I draw on advertising theory and consultancy tools (such as SWOT, AGCC, ELM and DAGMAR) to analyse the current seaweed market defining what I call a ‘consumer triad’ of potential consumers. Findings indicate many possibilities for future USP endorsements depending on the target market, from health-orientated to sustainably farmed. Seaweed interest appears to be more knowledge than consumer driven, so the question instead surrounds the prospect of knowledge sharing in an integrated online manner. Meanwhile, challenges in farming, labelling and conservation within the EU hamper advancements in the field, with the balance shifting to invested interest in Blue Economy models and IMTA systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Seaweed. Algae. Marketing Theory. History. Environmental. Advertising. Blue Economy.
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388412OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-388412DiVA, id: diva2:1333037
Subject / course
Archaeology
Educational program
Master Programme in Global Environmental History
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-06-29 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf