Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Domestic violence and perinatal outcomes - a prospective cohort study from Nepal
Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway;Kathmandu Univ, Sch Med Sci, GPO 11008, Kavre, Dhulikhel, Nepal.
Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway;Kathmandu Med Coll & Teaching Hosp, Dept Community Med, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway;St Olays Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8311-4956
Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Domestic violence is one of the most common forms of violence against women. Domestic violence during pregnancy is associated with adverse perinatal and maternal outcomes. We aimed to assess whether domestic violence was associated with mode of delivery, low birthweight and preterm birth in two sites in Nepal. Methods: In this prospective cohort study we consecutively recruited 2004 pregnant women during antenatal care at two hospitals between June 2015 and September 2016. The Abuse Assessment Screen (modified) was used to assess fear and violence. Having ever experienced either fear or violence was defined as any domestic violence. Obstetric outcomes were obtained from hospital records for 1381 (69%) women, selecting singleton pregnancies only. Mode of delivery was assessed as birth by cesarean section or not. A birthweight of less than 2500g was defined as low birthweight and preterm birth as birth before completion of 37weeks gestation. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations. Results: Twenty percent of the women reported any domestic violence. Among all 1381 women, 37.6% gave birth by cesarean section. Of those women who delivered by cesarean section, 84.7% had an emergency cesarean section. Less than 10% of the babies were born prematurely and 13.5% were born with low birthweight. We found no significant association between exposure to any domestic violence during pregnancy and risk of a low birthweight baby or birth by cesarean section. However, having experienced both violence and fear was significantly associated with giving birth to a preterm infant [aOR 2.33 (95% CI;1.10-4.73)]. Conclusions: Domestic violence is common in Nepal. This is a potential risk factor for severe morbidity and mortality in newborns. We found that the risk of having a preterm baby was higher for pregnant women who experienced both fear and violence. This should be recognized by the health sector. In this study, no significant differences were found in the rate of cesarean section nor low birthweight for women who had experienced any domestic violence compared to those who did not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC , 2019. Vol. 19, article id 671
Keywords [en]
Domestic violence, Perinatal outcomes, Low birthweight, Preterm birth, Cesarean section
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387941DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-6967-yISI: 000469787300002PubMedID: 31151395OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-387941DiVA, id: diva2:1331242
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 220893Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(589 kB)83 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 589 kBChecksum SHA-512
cf24ac542597d0cf1dd4740bd69af4fdc1d23ff05c2d9b4662a960b948a294391430a42f5bbc20df28c1d53c0041d90854c29e22978f94b327ff0f4d2bc107b3
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Darj, Elisabeth
By organisation
International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration
In the same journal
BMC Public Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 83 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 135 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf