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Ancient DNA from mastics solidifies connection between material culture and genetics of mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Scandinavia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Univ Oslo, Museum Cultural Hist, POB 6762, NO-0130 Oslo, Norway.
Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
Univ Oslo, Museum Cultural Hist, POB 6762, NO-0130 Oslo, Norway.
Univ Oslo, Museum Cultural Hist, POB 6762, NO-0130 Oslo, Norway.
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2019 (English)In: COMMUNICATIONS BIOLOGY, ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 2, article id 185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human demography research in grounded on the information derived from ancient DNA and archaeology. For example, the study on the early postglacial dual-route colonisation of the Scandinavian Peninsula is largely based on associating genomic data with the early dispersal of lithic technology from the East European Plain. However, a clear connection between material culture and genetics has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate that direct connection by analysing human DNA from chewed birch bark pitch mastics. These samples were discovered at Huseby Klev in western Sweden, a Mesolithic site with eastern lithic technology. We generated genome-wide data for three individuals, and show their affinity to the Scandinavian hunter-gatherers. Our samples date to 9880-9540 calBP, expanding the temporal range and distribution of the early Scandinavian genetic group. We propose that DNA from ancient mastics can be used to study environment and ecology of prehistoric populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 2, article id 185
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Archaeology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387279DOI: 10.1038/s42003-019-0399-1ISI: 000468006400001PubMedID: 31123709OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-387279DiVA, id: diva2:1329404
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

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