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Can You Read My Mind?: A Participatory Design Study of How a Humanoid Robot Can Communicate Its Intent and Awareness
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Communication between humans and interactive robots will benefit if people have a clear mental model of the robots' intent and awareness. The aim with this thesis was to investigate how human-robot interaction is affected by manipulation of social cues on the robot. The research questions were: How do social cues affect mental models of the Pepper robot, and how can a participatory design method be used for investigating how the Pepper robot could communicate intent and awareness? The hypothesis for the second question was that nonverbal cues would be preferred over verbal cues. An existing standard platform was used, Softbank's Pepper, as well as state-of-the-art tasks from the RoboCup@Home challenge. The rule book and observations from the 2018 competition were thematically coded and the themes created eight scenarios. A participatory design method called PICTIVE was used in a design study, where five student participants went through three phases, label, sketch and interview, to create a design for how the robot should communicate intent and awareness. The use of PICTIVE was a suitable way to extract a lot of design ideas. However, not all scenarios were optimal for the task. The design study confirmed the use of mediating physical attributes to alter the mental model of a humanoid robot to reach common ground. Further, it did not confirm the hypothesis that nonverbal cues would be preferred over verbal cues, though it did show that verbal cues would not be enough. This, however, needs to be further tested in live interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 67
Keywords [en]
human-robot interaction, social interaction, awareness, intention, hri, humanoid, robot interaction, robot, robocup, participatory design, pepper, theory of mind, common ground
Keywords [sv]
människa-robot interaktion, social interaktion, medvetenhet, intentioner, robotinteraktion
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158033ISRN: LIU-IDA/KOGVET-A--19/006--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-158033DiVA, id: diva2:1329112
Subject / course
Cognitive science
Presentation
2019-06-12, Linköping, 10:00 (Swedish)
Examiners
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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