Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pale, male and stale: To what extent does achieving the UK’s carbon budgets rely on greater diversity within the energy sector?
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

With increasing recognition that reducing carbon emissions from energy in the UK will make a significant contribution to the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change, and with carbon budgets forged following the Climate Change Act 2005 looking unlikely to be met, it is clear that sectoral changes are required to catalyse the decarbonisation process. Alongside the need for this industry to be at the forefront of decarbonisation, the energy sector needs to diversify and employ more women, Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME), LGBT and disabled people, as well as those from different social classes and varied educational backgrounds. In short, the energy industry in the UK presently has a diversity issue that transcends being an image problem; it is hampering progress. This masters’ thesis explores how the dual aims of decarbonisation and diversifying the workforce can aid one another, and the extent to which greater diversity within the energy sector could actually be the key to decarbonisation. Using transcripts from the interviews I conducted with eight individuals, as well as meta- analysis of existing data that examines the impacts of diversity in various industries, the ways in which greater diversity in the energy sector has the potential to be positive for decarbonisation are explored. Further, this paper also examines barriers to diversity, proposing a series of recommendations for industry and policy makers in order to create an energy sector that is more diverse. These recommendations can be found in the next steps section of the paper, which aims to provide guidance for those wishing to make the composition of their organisation more representative of wider society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 102
Keywords [en]
renewable energy, fossil fuels, decarbonisation, energy sector, extraction, climate change, Environmental Humanities, ecofeminism, Queer theory, workplace diversity, intersectionality.
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157998ISRN: LIU-TEMA G/GSIC2-A—19/003-SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-157998DiVA, id: diva2:1328737
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-23 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(595 kB)51 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 595 kBChecksum SHA-512
dbb8288cbcddf3ff39e8286937bcc537844aee6e06b0382c9aefc72b94e02553c05e54192baf8ebc815963507f0600f2de193e1ecaad5db4a52fff82fb092140
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
The Department of Gender Studies
Humanities and the Arts

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 51 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 44 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf