Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Experiences of returning to work and maintaining work 7 to 8 years after a stroke: a qualitative interview study in Sweden
Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7127-213x
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To explore how persons experienced return to work (RTW) and their work situation 7 to 8 years after a stroke.

DESIGN: An explorative qualitative design with individual interviews. The data analysis was inductive thematic and three researchers collaborated during the analysis process.

PARTICIPANTS: The study population included five women and eight men who had a stroke during 2009-2010, received care at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden and RTW after stroke and it was a heterogenic sample based on age, occupation, stroke severity and time to RTW.

RESULTS: The analysis led to four themes; motivated and RTW while struggling with impairments, mixed feelings in the RTW process, still at work though restricted and social support for a sustainable work situation. The themes revealed that participants were motivated to RTW while struggling with impairments. The RTW process evoked mixed feelings of worry and grief over lost functions but also acceptance and gratitude for being able to work. Although maintaining work 7 to 8 years after experiencing a stroke, most were restricted in some way. Fatigue and cognitive impairments meant having to set limits, omit work tasks and rest at work, but also rest during free time and refraining from social activities in order to manage work. Participants avoided work-related stress if they could because of aggravated symptoms and/or fear of a new stroke. Support from supervisors and colleagues was often crucial for a sustainable work situation.

CONCLUSION: Maintaining work can be a continuous struggle with invisible impairments many years after a stroke. Strategies for managing work are dependent on each individual work situation, where support and understanding at work seem to be crucial for a sustainable work situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021182
Keywords [en]
qualitative research, rehabilitation medicine, return to work, stroke, stroke medicine
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-30269DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021182PubMedID: 30012785OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-30269DiVA, id: diva2:1326538
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(688 kB)20 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 688 kBChecksum SHA-512
9f54c0354458e4d9fe8b9c5d3ca17526119661048c63fae3ac677e4b29cf4b966fc09143ee55e2ec72a15b0ef723946146faa62cd2636d2f6c6f34e2fb48d2d8
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Palstam, Annie
In the same journal
BMJ Open
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 20 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf