Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prestroke physical activity could influence acute stroke severity (part of PAPSIGOT)
Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7127-213x
2018 (English)In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 91, no 16, p. e1461-e1467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of prestroke physical activity (PA) on acute stroke severity.

METHODS: Data from patients with first stroke were retrieved from registries with a cross-sectional design. The variables were PA, age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and statin treatment, stroke severity, myocardial infarction, new stroke during hospital stay, and duration of inpatient care at stroke unit. PA was assessed with Saltin-Grimby's 4-level Physical Activity Level Scale, and stroke severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Logistic regression was used to predict stroke severity, and negative binomial regression was used to compare the level of PA and stroke severity.

RESULTS: The study included 925 patients with a mean age of 73.1 years, and 45.2% were women. Patients who reported light or moderate PA levels were more likely to present a mild stroke (NIHSS score 0 to 5) compared with physically inactive patients in a model that also included younger age as a predictor (odds ratio = 2.02 for PA and odds ratio = 0.97 for age). The explanatory value was limited at 6.8%. Prestroke PA was associated with less severe stroke, and both light PA such as walking at least 4 h/wk and moderate PA 2-3 h/wk appear to be beneficial. Physical inactivity was associated with increased stroke severity.

CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that PA and younger age could result in a less severe stroke. Both light PA such as walking at least 4 h/wk and moderate PA 2-3 h/wk appear to be beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 91, no 16, p. e1461-e1467
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-30268DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000006354PubMedID: 30232251OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-30268DiVA, id: diva2:1326533
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(299 kB)28 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 299 kBChecksum SHA-512
03428cd24b0c651018bc69068624f20664feae5be54f1307c72130d6d031f9e32b8f3878e7de4b585a666e3adb3e6752be0b32373ecbf269a29fe7e05cb6c495
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Palstam, Annie
In the same journal
Neurology
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 28 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf