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Benefits and risks of using clones in forestry - a review
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 352-359Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of vegetative propagation in forestry has a long history. In this chapter of special issue, the genetic gain from clonal forestry relative to family forestry is reviewed. Both theoretical studies and experimental data from progeny and clonal trials indicate that extra genetic gain (5-25%) is possible in conifer from clone testing and deployment relative to deployment of family forestry, effectively doubling that achievable from family forestry within the same generation. There are three perceived risks from using clones in forestry: (1) risk of plantation failure, (2) risk of diversity loss at the forest and landscape levels, and (3) risk associated with success rate of vegetative (or SE) propagation. Three theoretical models are reviewed and described to assess risk and to determine the number of clones required to mitigate these risks. All studies support that a "safe" number of clones is between 5 and 30. Genetic gains and experiences are reported for individual species, particularly in conifers, as well as in Eucalypts. The combination of genomic selection with somatic embryogenesis has the potential to accelerate the development of clonal forestry by shortening clonal testing or omitting long-term clonal testing completely.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 34, no 5, p. 352-359
Keywords [en]
Clonal forestry, genetic gain, vegetative propagation, risks, benefits
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160273DOI: 10.1080/02827581.2018.1487579ISI: 000469520300004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160273DiVA, id: diva2:1326326
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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