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Determining shallow P-wave velocity and its engineering implication in Adama City, Ethiopia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

A great number of the urban areas in Ethiopia are situated within the Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia, a system consisting of depressions and large faults. As a region with significant seismic activities, it is vital that careful planning is implemented to avoid constructing buildings on flat surfaces as they can amplify ground motion in the case of an earthquake.

 

This study was conducted in Adama, a city located within the rift system, to map and characterize the subsurface of a construction site with seismic refraction and investigate whether this is an optimal area to construct a building should an earthquake occur. Seismic refraction is based on Snell’s law, specifically the case of the critical angle, which is when the refracted angle is at 90 degrees and a number of the energy from the wave is rebounded back to the surface in accordance with Huygen’s Principle.    

 

Seismic waves were generated with a sledgehammer and recorded with 24 vertical geophones. The acquired data was then analysed with SeisImager and produced a 2D-tomography of the site with the corresponding velocity layers for a P-wave. Comparing the P-wave velocities to a table of Seismic Velocities of Rocks and Various Materials, one could determine that the subsurface layers consisted of rock soils, sand and silt. These are incredibly loose materials that will amplify ground motion during earthquake crisis and are therefore not optimal or ideal for constructing buildings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 19
Series
TVE-F ; 19005
Keywords [en]
Ethiopia, seismic refraction, earthquake
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385893OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-385893DiVA, id: diva2:1326284
Educational program
Master Programme in Engineering Physics
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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