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Spending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 7730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spending time in natural environments can benefit health and well-being, but exposure-response relationships are under-researched. We examined associations between recreational nature contact in the last seven days and self-reported health and well-being. Participants (n = 19,806) were drawn from the Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey (2014/15–2015/16); weighted to be nationally representative. Weekly contact was categorised using 60 min blocks. Analyses controlled for residential greenspace and other neighbourhood and individual factors. Compared to no nature contact last week, the likelihood of reporting good health or high well-being became significantly greater with contact ≥120 mins (e.g. 120–179 mins: ORs [95%CIs]: Health = 1.59 [1.31–1.92]; Well-being = 1.23 [1.08–1.40]). Positive associations peaked between 200–300 mins per week with no further gain. The pattern was consistent across key groups including older adults and those with long-term health issues. It did not matter how 120 mins of contact a week was achieved (e.g. one long vs. several shorter visits/week). Prospective longitudinal and intervention studies are a critical next step in developing possible weekly nature exposure guidelines comparable to those for physical activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, article id 7730
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385592DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-44097-3ISI: 000471218800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-385592DiVA, id: diva2:1325155
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-07-05Bibliographically approved

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