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Rebel Group Funding and Engagement in Rebel Governance: A Comparative Case Study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This thesis addresses an identified gap in the field of rebel governance and rebel funding, by theorizing and investigating how differences in rebel group funding sources affect a group’s engagement in rebel governance, distinguishing funding through natural resources from funding through non-natural resources. It is highlighted that these sources differ in three fundamental ways: their necessity for civilian labor and cooperation, the extent to which equipment, technology and infrastructure are required, and the expected time of pay-off. It is hypothesized that the degree to which a rebel group depends on natural resources determines the likelihood to which it engages in rebel governance - i.e. intervenes in all security, political, social, health and educational spheres of civilian life. This hypothesis is investigated through a comparative case study of two rebel groups from 2003 to 2018: the Taliban in Afghanistan, which generated its funding primarily through Afghanistan’s opium economy, and the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat, later known as Al-Qaeda in Maghreb, which generated its funding through ‘criminal activities’ such as kidnappings for ransom. The findings suggest some level of support for the hypothesis. Inconsistencies in the findings limiting generalizability and the need for further investigations are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 65
Keywords [en]
Rebel Governance, Rebel Funding, Political Economy of War, Natural Resources, Crime & Conflict, Taliban, GSPC, AQIM
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385134OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-385134DiVA, id: diva2:1322962
Educational program
Master Programme in Peace and Conflict Studies
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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