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"Like Tearing Out My Lungs": Mining and Contested Worldviews in the Sami Community
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This is an exploration of concepts and identities of Sami people in northern Sweden regarding conflicts on mining. The Sami have a history of feeling that others are encroaching on them and ignoring them and their wishes, the latest being the mining companies. There is also the issue of who gets to be considered as Sami and how the Sami identity is characterised. There are different positions among the Sami, some are enthusiastic and some are opposed. The view of the traditional land can be understood as a sacred connection with nature that is not understood by the majority society. Connecting with the land is vital as the link between the generations.

Sweden has been ranked as one of the world’s most attractive places for mining investments in recent years and it is seen as one of today’s biggest challenges for the survival of the Sami culture. The majority society’s and the mining industry’s view on sustainability includes opening of mines, to be able to extract minerals to use in wind parks and electric cars where the Sami are seen as standing in the way. A discourse in Sweden is that all of the north is a vast space, with fewer and fewer inhabitants. With many who are moving to the bigger cities in the south, this is also seen as a way to create jobs for a hopeful future in the towns up north. The Sami faces a misunderstanding majority society where their history is not recognised and the strengthening of indigenous peoples’ rights in recent years have only lead to symbolic gestures for the Sami.

This thesis has been made through spending time with these groups as well as trying to be a sensitive researcher who will contribute to the interest and understanding of those written about.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 61
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384507OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-384507DiVA, id: diva2:1320853
Subject / course
Religion in Peace and Conflict
Educational program
Master Programme in Religion in Peace and Conflict
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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