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The cultural politics of using technology to support the aesthetic in jazz record production
Manchester Metropolitan University. (ARP2017)
Number of Authors: 12019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 12thArt of Record Production Conference: Mono: Stereo: Multi / [ed] Jan-Olof Gullö, Stockholm: Royal College of Music (KMH) & Art of Record Production , 2019, p. 329-346Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses the attitudes some contemporary jazz musicians havetoward the use of technology and the thresholds of studio ‘intervention’ theyare willing to cross in order to achieve their preferred studio recording aesthetic.The discussion draws upon personal experiences of mainly free jazzproduction, and also the returns of a pilot survey of jazz musicians, who werepolled on the subject of the use of technology in the production of jazz recordings.Grounded theory was utilised as a methodology to code the surveyresponses into two main categories of ‘idealistic’ and ‘pragmatic’ responses.This coding enabled a discussion of the themes which were evident in the responses.This limited study found that clear consensus on the extent to whichstudio techniques should be used in the production of jazz recordings was notapparent in the data. There were instances where some studio techniqueswere considered acceptable, whilst others which were as similarly technicallyinvasive as the acceptable, were not acceptable. It also appeared that it wasgenerally acceptable to edit pre-composed elements of the musical performances,but not acceptable to edit improvisations. This perhaps reinforces thenotion that for the jazz performer the ephemeral ‘moment’, which many studioproductions aim to represent, occurs when they are improvising. Finally,it appears for these participants, whether a studio intervention such as an editis audible in the final recording is irrelevant. The fact that a studio interventionwas required or occurred due to perceived deficiencies in the recordedperformance, crosses the boundary of acceptability in terms of their own interpretationof ‘authenticity’ in jazz recordings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Royal College of Music (KMH) & Art of Record Production , 2019. p. 329-346
National Category
Music
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kmh:diva-3141ISBN: 978-91-983869-9-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kmh-3141DiVA, id: diva2:1320475
Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-04

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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