Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Energy Performance Certificates and Historic Apartment Buildings: A Method to Encourage User Participation and Sustainability in the Refurbishment Process
Norwegian Inst Cultural Heritage Res NIKU, Dept Bldg, Oslo, Norway.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History, Conservation.
2019 (English)In: The Historic Environment: Policy & Practice, ISSN 1756-7505, E-ISSN 1756-7513, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 224-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents and discusses the challenges of refurbishing historic apartment buildings by correlating findings from research projects LEAF and CulClim. Our aim is to shed light on how residents can partake in and optimise the refurbishment process after energy performance certificates (EPC) have been conducted. The background is that historic apartment buildings are generally more complex than single family buildings with respect to the energy efficiency process as they often have multiple owners with different priorities. The case studies from Norway and Sweden have conceptually contrasting energy performance certificate (EPC) systems. Identified advantages and shortcomings concerning both systems are discussed. In Sweden, the restrained recommendation of measures can lead to national mitigation targets not being realised. In Norway, excessive and unqualified recommendations risk reducing the cultural heritage values of the existing building stock as well as having a negative environmental impact on greenhouse gas emissions. A bottom-up approach incorporating the resident's objectives is presented and discussed. Results suggest that improved EPC-systems and a broadened procedural approach to decision making will ease the process and improve the outcome of the refurbishment with respect to both energy and heritage aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 10, no 2, p. 224-240
Keywords [en]
Historic buildings, energy efficiency, apartment, energy performance certificate, user participation, cultural heritage, building conservation, Norway, Sweden
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384002DOI: 10.1080/17567505.2019.1592836ISI: 000466888400007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-384002DiVA, id: diva2:1318787
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2091 kB)64 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2091 kBChecksum SHA-512
dea7507bbf8f820c978cad2ce23d74b71a0182138e7830ee3b5495b9069659bf674abace760a655013fcd04ade443f2aa05c05d1a6a16a699d9b7b44817e0645
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Donarelli, Anna
By organisation
Conservation
In the same journal
The Historic Environment: Policy & Practice
Building Technologies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 64 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 159 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf