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Osteopontin and Disease Activity in Patients with Recent-onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Results from the SLICC Inception Cohort
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2125-2931
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0153-9249
Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 492-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. In cross-sectional studies, elevated osteopontin (OPN) levels have been proposed to reflect, and/or precede, progressive organ damage and disease severity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed, in a cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE, to determine whether raised serum OPN levels precede damage and/or are associated with disease activity or certain disease phenotypes. Methods. We included 344 patients from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Inception Cohort who had 5 years of followup data available. All patients fulfilled the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Baseline sera from patients and from age-and sex-matched population-based controls were analyzed for OPN using ELISA. Disease activity and damage were assessed at each annual followup visit using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), respectively. Results. Compared to controls, baseline OPN was raised 4-fold in SLE cases (p amp;lt; 0.0001). After relevant adjustments in a binary logistic regression model, OPN levels failed to significantly predict global damage accrual defined as SDI amp;gt;= 1 at 5 years. However, baseline OPN correlated with SLEDAI-2K at enrollment into the cohort (r = 0.27, p amp;lt; 0.0001), and patients with high disease activity (SLEDAI-2K amp;gt;= 5) had raised serum OPN (p amp;lt; 0.0001). In addition, higher OPN levels were found in patients with persistent disease activity (p = 0.0006), in cases with renal involvement (p amp;lt; 0.0001) and impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.01). Conclusion. The performance of OPN to predict development of organ damage was not impressive. However, OPN associated significantly with lupus nephritis and with raised disease activity at enrollment, as well as over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
J RHEUMATOL PUBL CO , 2019. Vol. 46, no 5, p. 492-500
Keywords [en]
SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS; BIOMARKERS; OSTEOPONTIN; DISEASE ACTIVITY; ORGAN DAMAGE; PROGNOSIS
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156906DOI: 10.3899/jrheum.180713ISI: 000466402600010PubMedID: 30647177OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-156906DiVA, id: diva2:1318776
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Rheumatism Association; County Council of Ostergotland; Swedish Society of Medicine; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemasons foundation; King Gustaf Vs 80-year anniversary foundation; Hanyang University [201600000001387]; Lupus UK; NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility; US National Institutes of Health (NIH) [AR43727]; Singer Family Fund for Lupus Research; Arthritis Research UK; NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre; NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility at Manchester University National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust; Danish Rheumatism Association [A1028]; NIH [RR00046]

Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-18

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Wirestam, LinaEnocsson, HelenaSkogh, ThomasWettero, JonasSjöwall, Christoffer
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