Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinically Exploiting Cancer-specific Metabolism: Why Is Tumor Metabolism Not More Extensively Translated into Clinical Targets and Biomarkers?
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3676-817X
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 1385Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tumor cells exhibit a specialized metabolism supporting their superior ability for rapid proliferation, migration, and apoptotic evasion. It is reasonable to assume that the specific metabolic needs of the tumor cells can offer an array of therapeutic windows as pharmacological disturbance may derail the biochemical mechanisms necessary for maintaining the tumor characteristics, while being less important for normally proliferating cells. In addition, the specialized metabolism may leave a unique metabolic signature which could be used clinically for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. Quantitative global metabolic profiling (metabolomics) has evolved over the last two decades. However, despite the technology's present ability to measure 1000s of endogenous metabolites in various clinical or biological specimens, there are essentially no examples of metabolomics investigations being translated into actual utility in the cancer clinic. This review investigates the current efforts of using metabolomics as a tool for translation of tumor metabolism into the clinic and further seeks to outline paths for increasing the momentum of using tumor metabolism as a biomarker and drug target opportunity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 20, no 6, article id 1385
Keywords [en]
translational medicine, metabolomics, metabolism, cancer, tumor, biomarker, drug discovery, metabolic homeostasis
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158594DOI: 10.3390/ijms20061385ISI: 000464326900019PubMedID: 30893889OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158594DiVA, id: diva2:1318327
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2139 kB)42 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2139 kBChecksum SHA-512
404743cc50f26d42c47136b492234dc6e8cc5af6bec34e31066c5755236dbac5cacf114edd3742464dd270ced20445d06fd6849701e74f1a206c228391b28124
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Muthu, MageshNordström, Anders
By organisation
Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology)
In the same journal
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Cancer and Oncology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 42 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 90 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf