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Landscape process domains drive patterns of CO2 evasion from river networks
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (Climate Impacts Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7853-2531
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (Climate Impacts Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5758-2705
SLU.
Stockholm University.
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2019 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 87-95Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streams are important emitters of CO2 but extreme spatial variability in their physical properties can make upscaling very uncertain. Here, we determined critical drivers of stream CO2 evasion at scales from 30 to 400 m across a 52.5 km2 catchment in northern Sweden. We found that turbulent reaches never have elevated CO2 concentrations, while less turbulent locations can potentially support a broad range of CO2 concentrations, consistent with global observations. The predictability of stream pCO2 is greatly improved when we include a proxy for soil‐stream connectivity. Catchment topography shapes network patterns of evasion by creating hydrologically linked “domains” characterized by high water‐atmosphere exchange and/or strong soil‐stream connection. This template generates spatial variability in the drivers of CO2 evasion that can strongly bias regional and global estimates. To overcome this complexity, we provide the foundations of a mechanistic framework of CO2 evasion by considering how landscape process domains regulate transfer and supply.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019. Vol. 4, no 4, p. 87-95
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158874DOI: 10.1002/lol2.10108ISI: 000474692600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158874DiVA, id: diva2:1315354
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013‐5001Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Biophysical controls on CO2 evasion from Arctic inland waters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biophysical controls on CO2 evasion from Arctic inland waters
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

CO2 evasion to the atmosphere from inland waters is a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Yet spatial patterns of CO2 evasion and the sources of C that fuel evasion remain poorly understood. In this thesis, I use detailed measurements of biological and physical drivers of CO2 evasion to assess how C is transformed and evaded from inland waters in the Arctic (Northern Scandinavia and Alaska). I found that lake size was a master variable controlling lake CO2 evasion in an Arctic catchment and that large lakes play a major role at the landscape scale. In stream networks, I found that catchment topography shapes patterns of CO2 evasion by dictating unique domains with high lateral inputs of C, other domains where biological processes were dominant, and domains where physical forces promoted degassing to the atmosphere. Together, these topographically driven domains created a strong spatial heterogeneity that biases regional and global estimates of CO2 evasion. Further, I found that photosynthetic activity in Arctic streams can produce a large change in CO2 concentrations from night to day, and as a result CO2 evasion is up to 45% higher during night than day. The magnitude of the diel change in CO2 was also affected by the turbulence of the stream and photo-chemical production of CO2. Overall, this thesis offers important insights to better understand landscape patterns of CO2 evasion from inland waters, and suggests that stream metabolic processes largely determine the fate of the C delivered from Arctic soils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2019. p. 32
Keywords
Inland waters, carbon dioxide, organic carbon, inorganic carbon, arctic, CO2 evasion, DOC, DIC, streams, metabolism, oxygen
National Category
Physical Geography Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158882 (URN)978-91-7855-075-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-06-14, Carl Kempe Salen, KBC, Umeå University, Umeå, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved

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Rocher-Ros, GerardSponseller, Ryan A.Giesler, Reiner
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