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Class II contact‐dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems allow for broad‐range cross‐species toxin delivery within the Enterobacteriaceae family
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9499-9227
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2480-563
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3275-0936
2019 (English)In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 1109-1125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contact‐dependent growth inhibition (CDI) allows bacteria to recognize kin cells in mixed bacterial populations. In Escherichia coli, CDI mediated effector delivery has been shown to be species‐specific, with a preference for the own strain over others. This specificity is achieved through an interaction between a receptor‐binding domain in the CdiA protein and its cognate receptor protein on the target cell. But how conserved this specificity is has not previously been investigated in detail. Here, we show that class II CdiA receptor‐binding domains and their Enterobacter cloacae analog are highly promiscuous, and can allow for efficient effector delivery into several different Enterobacteriaceae species, including Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella and Salmonella spp. In addition, although we observe a preference for the own receptors over others for two of the receptor‐binding domains, this did not limit cross‐species effector delivery in all experimental conditions. These results suggest that class II CdiA proteins could allow for broad‐range and cross‐species growth inhibition in mixed bacterial populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 111, no 4, p. 1109-1125
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382983DOI: 10.1111/mmi.14214ISI: 000464655800017PubMedID: 30710431OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-382983DiVA, id: diva2:1315210
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Research CouncilÅke Wiberg FoundationWenner-Gren FoundationsAvailable from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved

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