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Translocation of surface-localized effectors in type III secretion
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
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2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 1639-1644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pathogenic Yersinia species suppress the host immune response by using a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) to trans- locate virulence proteins into the cytosol of the target cells. T3SS- dependent protein translocation is believed to occur in one step from the bacterial cytosol to the target-cell cytoplasm through a conduit created by the T3SS upon target cell contact. Here, we report that T3SS substrates on the surface of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are translocated into target cells. Upon host cell contact, purified YopH coated on Y. pseudotuberculosis was specifically and rapidly trans- located across the target-cell membrane, which led to a physiological response in the infected cell. In addition, translocation of externally added YopH required a functional T3SS and a specific translocation domain in the effector protein. Efficient, T3SS-dependent transloca- tion of purified YopH added in vitro was also observed when using coated Salmonella typhimurium strains, which implies that T3SS- mediated translocation of extracellular effector proteins is conserved among T3SS-dependent pathogens. Our results demonstrate that polarized T3SS-dependent translocation of proteins can be achieved through an intermediate extracellular step that can be reconstituted in vitro. These results indicate that translocation can occur by a differ- ent mechanism from the assumed single-step conduit model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 108, no 4, p. 1639-1644
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Microbiology in the medical area
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382886DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1013888108OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-382886DiVA, id: diva2:1313694
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved

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Wang-Edgren, Helen
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