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Uneven global distribution of food web studies under climate change
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. The Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, The Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen,Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
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2019 (English)In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e02645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trophic interactions within food webs affect species distributions, coexistence, and provision of ecosystem services but can be strongly impacted by climatic changes. Understanding these impacts is therefore essential for managing ecosystems and sustaining human well-being. Here, we conducted a global synthesis of terrestrial, marine, and freshwater studies to identify key gaps in our knowledge of climate change impacts on food webs and determine whether the areas currently studied are those most likely to be impacted by climate change. We found research suffers from a strong geographic bias, with only 3.5% of studies occurring in the tropics. Importantly, the distribution of sites sampled under projected climate changes was biased-areas with decreases or large increases in precipitation and areas with low magnitudes of temperature change were under-represented. Our results suggest that understanding of climate change impacts on food webs could be broadened by considering more than two trophic levels, responses in addition to species abundance and biomass, impacts of a wider suite of climatic variables, and tropical ecosystems. Most importantly, to enable better forecasts of biodiversity responses to dimate change, we identify critically under-represented geographic regions and climatic conditions which should be prioritized in future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 10, no 3, article id e02645
Keywords [en]
aquatic, climate change, data gaps, extreme events, food webs, freshwater, global, marine, ecipitation, species interactions, terrestrial, warming
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158383DOI: 10.1002/ecs2.2645ISI: 000463977000031OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158383DiVA, id: diva2:1307630
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved

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Sundqvist, Maja K.Nilsson, Karin A.
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