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Association between Mortality and Short-Term Exposure to Particles, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide in Stockholm, Sweden
Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden. Environment and Health Administration, SLB, Box 8136, 104 20 Stockholm, Sweden..
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 6, article id E1028Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, the effects on daily mortality in Stockholm associated with short-term exposure to ultrafine particles (measured as number of particles with a diameter larger than 4 nm, PNC₄), black carbon (BC) and coarse particles (PM2.5⁻10) have been compared with the effects from more common traffic-pollution indicators (PM10, PM2.5 and NO₂) and O₃ during the period 2000⁻2016. Air pollution exposure was estimated from measurements at a 20 m high building in central Stockholm. The associations between daily mortality lagged up to two days (lag 02) and the different air pollutants were modelled by using Poisson regression. The pollutants with the strongest indications of an independent effect on daily mortality were O₃, PM2.5⁻10 and PM10. In the single-pollutant model, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in O₃ was associated with an increase in daily mortality of 2.0% (95% CI: 1.1⁻3.0) for lag 01 and 1.9% (95% CI: 1.0⁻2.9) for lag 02. An IQR increase in PM2.5⁻10 was associated with an increase in daily mortality of 0.8% (95% CI: 0.1⁻1.5) for lag 01 and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.4⁻1.8) for lag 02. PM10 was associated with a significant increase only at lag 02, with 0.8% (95% CI: 0.08⁻1.4) increase in daily mortality associated with an IQR increase in the concentration. NO₂ exhibits negative associations with mortality. The significant excess risk associated with O₃ remained significant in two-pollutant models after adjustments for PM2.5⁻10, BC and NO₂. The significant excess risk associated with PM2.5⁻10 remained significant in a two-pollutant model after adjustment for NO₂. The significantly negative associations for NO₂ remained significant in two-pollutant models after adjustments for PM2.5⁻10, O₃ and BC. A potential reason for these findings, where statistically significant excess risks were found for O₃, PM2.5⁻10 and PM10, but not for NO₂, PM2.5, PNC₄ and BC, is behavioral factors that lead to misclassification in the exposure. The concentrations of O₃ and PM2.5⁻10 are in general highest during sunny and dry days during the spring, when exposure to outdoor air tend to increase, while the opposite applies to NO₂, PNC₄ and BC, with the highest concentrations during the short winter days with cold weather, when people are less exposed to outdoor air.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 16, no 6, article id E1028
Keywords [en]
PM2.5–10, excess risk, exposure, linear regression, mortality, ozone, particle number count (PNC)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157554DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16061028ISI: 000465159500128PubMedID: 30901873OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-157554DiVA, id: diva2:1299049
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved

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