Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Urban scaling and the regional divide
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5774-1553
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4876-7070
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1102-4342
2019 (English)In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 1, article id eaav0042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Superlinear growth in cities has been explained as an emergent consequence of increased social interactions in dense urban environments. Using geocoded microdata from Swedish population registers, we remove population composition effects from the scaling relation of wage income to test how much of the previously reported superlinear scaling is truly attributable to increased social interconnectivity in cities. The Swedish data confirm the previously reported scaling relations on the aggregate level, but they provide better information on the micromechanisms responsible for them. We find that the standard interpretation of urban scaling is incomplete as social interactions only explain about half of the scaling parameter of wage income and that scaling relations substantively reflect differences in cities sociodemographic composition. Those differences are generated by selective migration of highly productive individuals into larger cities. Big cities grow through their attraction of talent from their hinterlands and the already-privileged benefit disproportionally from urban agglomeration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE , 2019. Vol. 5, no 1, article id eaav0042
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154704DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav0042ISI: 000457547900092PubMedID: 30729161OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-154704DiVA, id: diva2:1292630
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council under the European Union [324233]; Norwegian Research Council [236793]; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond [M12-0301:1]; Swedish Research Council [445-2013-7681, 340-2013-5460]

Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-15

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(626 kB)66 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 626 kBChecksum SHA-512
520163c46b4a9bc345f879c7dfe55abd2a833d4d68e4d3b0485b7f5547786643f171fd45ae554b66a7a1c002d4b80cacc602ce3a032ebe734b913395011716d9
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Keuschnigg, MarcMutgan, SelcanHedström, Peter
By organisation
The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IASFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Science Advances
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 66 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 279 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf