Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?
Unit for Research and Development in Primary Health Care, Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
Linköping University. Unit for Research and Development in Primary Health Care, Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
Linköping University. Child Research Group, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Unit for Research and Development in Primary Health Care, Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Both high socioeconomic status (SES) and high physical activity (PA) are associated with better self-rated health (SRH) and higher quality-of-life (QoL).

Aim

To investigate whether high levels of PA may compensate for the association between low SES and subjective health outcomes in terms of poorer SRH and lower QoL.

Method

Data from a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 5326) was utilized. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between indicators of SES (economic situation and educational level), SRH and QoL, as well as between the combination of SES and PA in relation to SRH and QoL.

Result

Participants with high PA and economic problems had approximately the same OR for good SRH as those with low PA and without economic problems (OR 1.75 [95% CI 1.20–2.54] and 1.81 [1.25–2.63] respectively). Participants with high PA and low education had higher odds for good SRH (OR 3.34 [2.96–5.34] compared to those with low PA and high education (OR 1.46 [0.89–2.39]).Those with high PA and economic problems had an OR of 2.09 [1.42–3.08], for high QoL, while the corresponding OR for those with low PA and without economic problems was 4.38 [2.89–6.63].

Conclusion

Physically active people with low SES, had the same or even better odds to report good SRH compared to those with low PA and high SES. For QoL the result was not as consistent. The findings highlight the potential for promotion of PA to reduce SES-based inequalities in SRH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019. Vol. 17, article id 33
Keywords [en]
Physical activity; Health dialogue; Socioeconomic status; Self-rated health; Quality-of-life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154548DOI: 10.1186/s12955-019-1102-4ISI: 000458183400002PubMedID: 30736815Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061263688OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-154548DiVA, id: diva2:1290524
Note

Funding Agencies|Unit for Research and Development in Primary Health Care, Futurum Academy for Health and Care, Region Jonkoping County, Sweden; Swedish Research Council; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation

Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1046 kB)65 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1046 kBChecksum SHA-512
2dfd0fde310619d8bedbb4b1dc49607a31a87d232483eba8267384bdc7e2a190fdd432b69f8d67dbe4cd078acafa60b203918aa70d4ee6f6795713594186e156
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lingfors, HansGolsäter, MarieKristenson, MargaretaFransson, Eleonor I.
By organisation
Linköping UniversityDivision of Community MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
In the same journal
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 65 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 161 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf