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Sex-specific effects of parasites on telomere dynamics in a short-lived passerinethe blue tit
Univ Warsaw, Ctr New Technol, Banacha 2c, PL-02097 Warsaw, Poland;Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland.
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland.
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland.
Polish Acad Sci, Museum & Inst Zool, Ul Wilcza 64, PL-00679 Warsaw, Poland.
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2019 (English)In: The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, ISSN 0028-1042, E-ISSN 1432-1904, Vol. 106, no 1-2, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parasitic infections potentially drive host's life-histories since they can have detrimental effects on host's fitness. Telomere dynamics is a candidate mechanism to underlie life-history trade-offs and as such may correlate with observed fitness reduction in infected animals. We examined the relationship of chronic infection with two genera of haemosporidians causing avian malaria and malaria-like disease with host's telomere length (TL) in a longitudinal study of free-ranging blue tits. The observed overall infection prevalence was 80% and increased with age, constituting a potentially serious selective pressure in our population. We found longer telomeres in individuals infected with a parasite causing lesser blood pathologies i.e. Haemoproteus compared to Plasmodium genus, but this only held true among males. Female TL was independent of the infection type. Our results indicate that parasitic infections could bring about other types of costs to females than to males with respect to TL. Additionally, we detected linear telomere loss with age, however a random regression analysis did not confirm significant heterogeneity in TL of first breeders and telomere shortening rates in further life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG , 2019. Vol. 106, no 1-2, article id 6
Keywords [en]
Avian malaria, Bird, Chronic infection, Parasitaemia, Random regression
National Category
Zoology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377222DOI: 10.1007/s00114-019-1601-5ISI: 000457329900001PubMedID: 30701351OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-377222DiVA, id: diva2:1289212
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved

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