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Jerusalem and the Authority of Birgitta of Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. University of Oslo, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1072-9538
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Hagiography, Language and Literature, Latin, Mentalities, Religious Life
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160701OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160701DiVA, id: diva2:1252623
Conference
The 25th International Medieval Congress, Special Thematic Strand: 'Memory', Leeds, UK, July 2-5, 2018
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 263067
Note

Session 606: Tracing the Jerusalem Code, II: Travelling Memories and Sacralisation of Landscape.

Tracing the Jerusalem Code is a Norwegian-based international collaborative research project that investigates the image of Jerusalem in the religious, political, and artistic cultures of Scandinavia. The conversion of the North (9th-12th centuries.) implied the integration of this remote region into the European Christian culture through the adoption and remembrance of texts, rituals, images, and ideas transmitted through painted and written media, architectural forms, and liturgical practices. During this process, Jerusalem proved a potent topos, offering a means for shaping the new religious and political identity. In the first of two sessions, members of the research group will explore the multiple artistic and performative applications of the idea of Jerusalem in medieval Scandinavian parish churches. The second session is devoted to perceptions of historical Jerusalem as a sacred place, the power attributed to its shrines and the significance of Jerusalem as a Christian centre to which the periphery of the North could be connected.

Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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Output format
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