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Using hair, nail and urine samples for human exposure assessment of legacy and emerging per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 636, p. 383-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-invasive samples present ethical and practical benefits for investigating human exposure to hazardous contaminants, but analytical challenges and difficulties to interpret the results limit their application in biomonitoring. Here we investigated the potential for using hair, nail and urine samples as a measure of internal exposure to an array of legacy and emerging per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in two populations with different exposure conditions. Paired urine-serum measurements of PFASs from a group of highly exposed fishery employees displayed strong correlations for PFASs with three to eight perfluorinated carbons (p > 0.653; p < 0.01). Consistent statistical correlations and transfer ratios in nails and hair from both populations demonstrated that these non-invasive samples can be used as a measure of internal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and CS chlorinated polyfluoralkyl ether sulfonic acid (CS Cl-PFESA). Contrastingly, the infrequent detections and or lack of consistent transfer ratios for perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorononanoic acid and short-chain PFASs in hair and nail samples indicate passive uptake from the external environment rather than uptake and internal distribution. Collectively, the study supports the use of urine samples as a valid measure of internal exposure for a range of short- and medium-chain PFASs, while the validity of nail and hair samples as a measure of internal exposure may vary for different PFASs and populations. The ubiquitous detection of C8 CI-PFESA in all sample matrices from both populations indicates widespread exposure to this contaminant of emerging concern in China.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 636, p. 383-391
Keywords [en]
Non-invasive biomonitoring, Human exposure, PFASs, Cl-PFESAs
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160200DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.279ISI: 000436599000036PubMedID: 29709855OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160200DiVA, id: diva2:1251246
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved

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