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Striking difference in response to expanding brood parasites by birds in western and eastern Beringia
Okinawa Inst Sci & Technol, Tancha 1919-1, Okinawa 9040497, Japan;Univ Tennessee, Psychol Dept, Knoxville, TN 37996 USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Lund Univ, Mol Ecol & Evolut Lab, Solvegatan 37, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
Long Isl Univ Post, Dept Biol, Brookville, NY 11548 USA.
Univ Illinois, Sch Integrat Biol, Dept Anim Biol, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.
2018 (English)In: Journal of field ornithology, ISSN 0273-8570, E-ISSN 1557-9263, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two species of obligate brood-parasitic Cuculus cuckoos are expanding their ranges in Beringia. Both now breed on the Asian side, close to the Bering Strait, and are found in Alaska during the breeding season. From May to July 2017, we used painted 3D-printed model eggs of two cuckoo host-races breeding in northeastern Siberia to test behavioral responses of native songbirds on both sides of the Bering Strait, with particular attention to species that are known cuckoo hosts in their Siberian range. Each host nest was tested after the second egg was laid and, if possible, again 4 days later with a model of a different type. Although our Siberian study site was also outside the known breeding ranges of the cuckoos, we found that Siberian birds had strong anti-parasite responses, with 14 of 22 models rejected. In contrast, birds in Alaska had virtually no detectable anti-parasite behaviors, with only one of 96 models rejected; the rejecters were Red-throated Pipits (Anthus cervinus). Such differences suggest that the cuckoos might successfully parasitize naive hosts and become established in North America whether or not their historic host species are widely available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 89, no 2, p. 117-125
Keywords [en]
climate change, Common Cuckoo, Cuculus canorus, Cuculus saturatus, invasive species, Oriental Cuckoo, parasitism
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358528DOI: 10.1111/jofo.12247ISI: 000435942300002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-358528DiVA, id: diva2:1244709
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved

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