Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Background Odors Modulate N170 ERP Component and Perception of Emotional Facial Stimuli
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 72018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1000Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Successful social interaction relies on the accurate decoding of other peoples' emotional signals, and their contextual integration. However, little is known about how contextual odors may lead to modulation of cortical processing in response to facial expressions. We investigated how unpleasant and pleasant contextual background odors affected emotion perception and cortical event-related potential (ERP) responses to pictures of faces expressing happy, neutral and disgusted facial expressions. Faces were, regardless of expression, rated more positively in the pleasant odor condition and more negatively in the unpleasant odor condition. Faces were overall rated as more emotionally arousing in the presence of an odor, irrespective of its valence. Contextual odors also interacted with facial expressions, such that happy faces were rated as especially non-arousing in the unpleasant odor condition. The early, face-sensitive N170 ERP component also displayed an interaction effect. Here, disgusted faces were affected by the odor context such that the N170 revealed a relatively larger negativity in the context of a pleasant odor compared with an unpleasant odor. There were no odor effects on the responses to faces in other measured ERP components (P1, VPP, P2, and LPP). These results suggest that odors bias socioemotional perception early stages of the visual processing stream. However, effects may vary across emotional expressions and measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 9, article id 1000
Keywords [en]
ERP, facial expressions, emotion, odors, N170, LPP
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158235DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01000ISI: 000436327500001PubMedID: 29997539OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-158235DiVA, id: diva2:1239669
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences (M14-0375:1); and Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation (MMW 2014:0178) to JO.

Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Syrjänen, ElmeriWiens, StefanFischer, HåkanZakrzewska, MartaWartel, AndreasLarsson, MariaOlofsson, Jonas K.
By organisation
Perception and psychophysicsBiological psychology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 69 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf