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Production of Edible Fungi from Potato Protein Liquor (PPL) in Airlift Bioreactor
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Biotechnology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1711-7294
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Biotechnology)
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Biotechnology)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4887-2433
2017 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 12-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
In my opinion, the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

Potato protein liquor (PPL), a side stream from the potato starch industry, is normally used as fertilizer. However, with more than 100 g/L of sugars, 20 g/L of Kjeldahl nitrogen and Chemical Oxigen Demand (COD) of 300 g/L, it represents serious environmental challenges. The use of PPL for fungal cultivation is a promising solution to convert this waste into valuable products. In this study, PPL was characterized and used to cultivate edible zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae, which is widely used in Southeast Asian cuisine to prepare e.g., tempeh. Moreover, it can be potentially used as a protein source in animal feed worldwide. Under the best conditions, 65.47 ± 2.91 g of fungal biomass per litre of PPL was obtained in airlift bioreactors. The total Kjeldahl nitrogen content of the biomass was above 70 g/kg dry biomass. The best results showed 51% reduction of COD and 98.7% reduction in the total sugar content of PPL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland, 2017. Vol. 3, no 1, p. 12-
Keywords [en]
airlift bioreactor; filamentous fungal biomass; fungal pellets; potato protein liquor; Rhizopus oryzae
National Category
Water Treatment
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14903DOI: 10.3390/fermentation3010012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-14903DiVA, id: diva2:1237420
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Fungi-based biorefinery model for food industry waste: progress toward a circular economy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fungi-based biorefinery model for food industry waste: progress toward a circular economy
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The food industry, one of the most important industrial sectors worldwide, generates large amounts of biodegradable waste with high organic load. In recent years, the traditional management methods to treat this waste (e.g., landfilling) have been considered not suitable because they do not exploit the potential of the waste material. Alternatively, valorization of food industry waste via a biorefinery model using filamentous fungi is considered to represent an attractive strategy because it minimizes the negative impacts while recovering the nutrients and energy of the waste, in accordance with the concept of the circular economy.

In this thesis, four food processing wastes were utilized as case studies: potato protein liquor (PPL, the soluble fraction of potato starch production waste), the peels wasted during orange juice production, the starchy byproduct of pea protein processes, and the wastewater of a wheat-starch plant. Rhizopus oryzae, a zygomycetous filamentous fungus, was grown with these wastes as a substrate, yielding biomass containing 43% (w/w) protein together with 51% removal of the chemical oxygen demand when cultivated in tenfold-diluted PPL. Moreover, protein-rich biomass was produced using the pea-processing byproduct (55%) and wheat-starch wastewater (51%). In contrast, cultivation in orange peel extract yielded a biomass rich in lipids (20%). The use of PPL was also studied in terms of the economy of fungal cultivation. The biotreatment was found to require only 46% of the capital investment necessary for treating PPL by the traditional strategy (application as fertilizer). In comparison, the ascomycetous fungus Aspergillus oryzae yielded superior results compared to those of R. oryzae when grown in the starchy residues. The high protein content of the fungal biomass encouraged the investigation of its use for bioplastic production. The addition of 20% fungal biomass in a pectin matrix increased the tensile yield of the film and reduced the elongation at break. Moreover, a positive effect on water vapor permeability of the film was also observed.

These results indicate the ability of the filamentous fungi to convert resources wasted by the food industry into new products with positive impacts on the economy and the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2018
Series
Skrifter från Högskolan i Borås, ISSN 0280-381X ; 89
Keywords
filamentous fungi, circular economy, biorefinery, food industry, fungal biomass, bioplastic, resource recovery
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14888 (URN)978-91-88838-00-1 (ISBN)978-91-88838-01-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-25, 310, University of Borås, Allégatan 1, Borås, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved

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