Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Psychology, meaning making, and the study of worldviews: Beyond religion and non-religion
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9944-1241
2018 (English)In: Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, ISSN 1941-1022, E-ISSN 1943-1562, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To get beyond the solely negative identities signaled by atheism and agnosticism, we have to conceptualize an object of study that includes religions and nonreligions. We advocate a shift from “religions” to “worldviews” and define worldviews in terms of the human ability to ask and reflect on “big questions” (BQs; e.g., what exists? how should we live?). From a worldviews perspective, atheism, agnosticism, and theism are competing claims about one feature of reality and can be combined with various answers to the BQs to generate a wide range of worldviews. To lay a foundation for the multidisciplinary study of worldviews that includes psychology and other sciences, we ground them in humans’ evolved world-making capacities. Conceptualizing worldviews in this way allows us to identify, refine, and connect concepts that are appropriate to different levels of analysis. We argue that the language of enacted and articulated worldviews (for humans) and worldmaking and ways of life (for humans and other animals) is appropriate at the level of persons or organisms and that the language of sense making, schemas, and meaning frameworks is appropriate at the cognitive level (for humans and other animals). Viewing the meaning making processes that enable humans to generate worldviews from an evolutionary perspective allows us to raise new questions for psychology with particular relevance for the study of nonreligious worldviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 10, no 3, p. 207-217
Keywords [en]
worldviews, meaning-making, non-religion
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
religionspsykologi
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158448DOI: 10.1037/rel0000201ISI: 000440009400002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-158448DiVA, id: diva2:1236559
Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(390 kB)9 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 390 kBChecksum SHA-512
c95dee479386a1f3a9e0623e1307415606d0db19d07bff8768f2b0aa56f1e94f212a8ef36f6170bbe8f3e1856e3daa66243904c9f915372653d83f9cd70dfb10
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Asprem, Egil
By organisation
History of Religions
In the same journal
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 9 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf