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Oxygen minimum zones in the early Cambrian ocean
Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster, England; Univ Cambridge, Dept Earth Sci, Cambridge, England.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ Cambridge, Dept Earth Sci, Cambridge, England.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5774-9114
Univ Leeds, Sch Earth & Environm, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
Univ Leicester, Dept Geol, Leicester, Leics, England.
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2018 (English)In: Geochemical Perspectives Letters, ISSN 2410-339X, Vol. 6, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between the evolution of early animal communities and oceanic oxygen levels remains unclear. In particular, uncertainty persists in reconstructions of redox conditions during the pivotal early Cambrian (541-510 million years ago, Ma), where conflicting datasets from deeper marine settings suggest either ocean anoxia or fully oxygenated conditions. By coupling geochemical palaeo-redox proxies with a record of organic-walled fossils from exceptionally well-defined successions of the early Cambrian Baltic Basin, we provide evidence for the early establishment of modern-type oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Both inner- and outer-shelf environments were pervasively oxygenated, whereas mid-depth settings were characterised by spatially oscillating anoxia. As such, conflicting redox signatures recovered from individual sites most likely derive from sampling bias, whereby anoxic conditions represent mid-shelf environments with higher productivity. This picture of a spatially restricted anoxic wedge contrasts with prevailing models of globally stratified oceans, offering a more nuanced and realistic account of the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic ocean transition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 6, p. 33-38
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Geology Geochemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355701DOI: 10.7185/geochemlet.1806ISI: 000431518600004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-355701DiVA, id: diva2:1230875
Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved

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