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How do teachers interpret and transform entrepreneurship education?
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. (Vuxenpedagogik och Folkbildning)
Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, entrepreneurship education has become a central curricular topic in many locations in the world. In Sweden, entrepreneurship education was implemented in the curriculum for the first time in 2011, as something that should be included in all upper secondary school pro- grammes. In this article, we focus on one of these programmes, the handicraft programme, investigating how entrepreneurship education is formulated in the latest curriculum and how teachers understand and transform such content in their teaching. Drawing on Bernstein’s concepts of classification and framing, we illustrate how entrepreneurship education in the Swedish curriculum has a ‘dual definition’, representing very different framing and classification, but still clearly belongs in a ‘market relevance’ discourse. This is expressed through the way in which the concept is transformed by teachers in their teaching. We also find that entrepreneurship education has low legitimacy among teachers, particularly when it is classified weakly. The weak framing and classification, taken together with the low legitimacy among teachers, are likely to lead to very different transformations of entre- preneurship education in different educational contexts. In the long run, this could have a negative effect on the equivalence of teaching at upper secondary school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018.
Keywords [en]
Entrepreneurship; vocational education; curriculum; classification; framing; market relevance
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149506DOI: 10.1080/00220272.2018.1488998Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85049219384OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-149506DiVA, id: diva2:1230352
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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