Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Why People Hate Health Economics – Two Psychological Explanations
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8159-1249
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Most people dislike the idea of “health economists” having influence on medical decision making and who gets what when it comes to health care. Health economics is often thought of as inhumane, promoting efficiency at the expense of more profound moral values, such as equality and need. The fact that allocations solely based on cost-effectiveness are unlikely to be compatible with public views has been illustrated in experimental studies (1, 2). Moreover, lessons from the Oregon experience on priority setting illuminated that rationing decisions based on health maximization are likely to conflict with the view of the general public. For an economist this can be hard to understand, why is not the quest to maximize the value for money something that strikes a chord with the general public? Here we will outline two fundamental psychological mechanisms that will help to explain why people hate health economics.

The two psychological mechanisms – taboo-tradeoffs and compassion fade – are emotional phenomena that bias decision-making. These biases are of amplified by the fact that health is of special moral importance to most people. Not only our own health, but other people’s health as well. Moreover, decisions on how to allocate scarce resources in health care also ultimately lead to policies that carry life and death consequences. Thus, health care rationing elicits strong emotions making it an area of decision-making where emotion and reason often diverge. We will argue that health economics at large has been oblivious to the core aspects of human nature outlined in this paper, and this has limited the use of health economics as a productive input in health policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018. , p. 12
Series
Linköping University Working Papers in Economics ; 6
Keywords [en]
Health Economics, Medical Decision Making, Health Care Priority setting, Emotions, Psychology
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148852OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-148852DiVA, id: diva2:1221921
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Why People Hate Health Economics – Two Psychological Explanations(210 kB)206 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 210 kBChecksum SHA-512
190fef3a584370ec916092d589dccfe0de555e3c2cba2a673da0383ca06b7438780ca2eba104d9beb1912eae7394adee52f07bf26034aa1a79375cffaa2217d1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tinghög, GustavVästfjäll, Daniel
By organisation
EconomicsFaculty of Arts and SciencesPsychology
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 206 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1152 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf