Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Self-reported Health and Pain Sensitivity in  Low Back Pain: Differences between Individuals with and without Pain Radiation to Lower Limbs
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability and is often accompanied with a back-related leg pain (around 60%), where those with radiating pain show worse overall clinical outcomes. Previous studies comparing these two groups have involved individuals with chronic LBP. It is not known if subjects who currently have LBP differ in pain sensitivity from those who have currently LBP accompanied with pain radiation to lower limbs.

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are differences in self-reported health and pain sensitivity between individuals currently having LBP with and without pain radiation to lower limbs.

Method: Individuals with LBP (n=100) aged 40 to 70 years participated in this study. According the first question of STarT Back Pain Screening Tool about the pain radiation to leg(s), individuals were divided into two groups: radiation group (RG, n=36) and no radiation group (noRG, n=64). To gain the information about self-reported health, following questionnaires were used: Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured with algometer (6 sites and 4 points of ’lower body’: gluteal and knee points). Mann-Whitney U-test was used to calculate differences on group and gender level. A logistic regression analyses was calculated (crude model), where belong to RG or not was the dependent variable and all self-reported data and PPTs were independent variables, all data were controlled for gender and age.

Results: The RG reported worse disability (p=0.017), higher fear-avoidance beliefs (FAB) about physical activity (p=0.003), worse score in anxiety (p=0.002) and depression (p=0.001), and increased pain sensitivity (p=0.043) in 6 sites PPTs compared to the noRG. Higher score of disability, FAB (physical activity and work), anxiety and depression were associated with an increased risk of belonging to the RG (OR 1.05-1.50, 95% CI 1.01-1.94), controlled for gender and age.

Conclusion: Individuals with LBP and pain radiation to lower limbs showed worse self-reported disability and fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity than those with LBP only. Further, those with pain radiation were more sensitive to pain in general. Worse scores of all studied self-reported data were associated with an increased risk of belonging to the groups with pain radiation. To study gender differences larger sample sizes are needed. Individuals with LBP and pain radiation to lower limbs showed worse outcomes and therefore should receive a different treatment approach than those who have only LBP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 38
Keywords [en]
low back pain, pain radiation, pressure pain thresholds, questionnaire
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36955OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-36955DiVA, id: diva2:1215792
Educational program
Master's Programme in Exercise Biomedicine - Human Performance
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-09 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2103 kB)8 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 2103 kBChecksum SHA-512
5439b9f0a635bb82eeb1a4e5db4a270b389a8536f5c5debb299943265263e80e68b2a2dba77b8515cc641cb674b1259631ede53855cc45871f6e9f70d15fe007
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Business, Engineering and Science
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 8 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 28 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf