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Differences in the Perception of Brand Personality
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: The process connected to understanding perceived brand personality is discussed as well as how perceived brand personality may be affected by different cultures. Finally, the reader is introduced to the sportswear fashion industry, namely Adidas. The research questions are introduced.

Literature Review: The concept of standardisation vs adaptation is introduced, leading to a discussion regarding social media as a form of standardised marketing and how Adidas use it. The concept of culture is addressed with additional information regarding gender identity. Aaker’s dimensions of brand personality are discussed as well as how they are used to measure brand personality. Finally, brand personality’s relationship with brand loyalty as a (leading in to brand equity) and how brand personality may be used to determine brand preference are discussed.

Theoretical Framework: The adapted model of how this thesis’s research will be undertaken are presented along with 5 hypotheses that will be tested.

Methodology: This thesis follows a quantitative research method, namely the distribution of surveys. Saunder’s Research Onion is used as a guideline for the sections of the methodology. The design of the survey is discussed followed by how the authors will ensure for reliability and validity.

Empirical Findings and Discussion: The authors found that national culture and gender identity play a role in shaping perceived brand personality of Adidas. Further findings show that brand preference cannot be determined based on a countries classification as masculine or feminine.

Conclusion: A summary of the findings and discussion are presented. This is followed by managerial implications, where the authors attain to the fact that if brands are to continue using standardised messages they must structure it in a way that takes all culture groups into account or alternatively opt for adapted marketing messages. Finally, limitations and future research are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 80
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39807ISRN: JU-IHH-FÖA-2-20180691OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-39807DiVA, id: diva2:1213473
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Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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