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Patterns of changing residential preferences during late adulthood
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
2018 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Earlier research on residential mobility has demonstrated a tendency for the young old of the 55+-population to prefer peripheral locations, whereas older age groups choose central locations. Here, we present survey results indicating that such late-adulthood differences in preferences are supported by age–related shifts corresponding to differences in housing preferences expressed by individuals in peripheral as well as central locations in Sweden. A sample of 2,400 individuals aged 55 years and over was asked to select the seven most important characteristics of a dwelling from a list of 21 alternatives (SHIELD survey 2013). The preferences expressed were used as dependent variables in logistic regressions to determine to what extent the housing preferences of older people are linked to age, gender, socio-economic status and type of geographical area. The results demonstrated a close link between neighbourhood characteristics and housing preferences. Owning the dwelling, having a garden, and access to nature were stressed as important by individuals living in non-metropolitan middle-class areas and in suburban elite areas. The youngest cohort expressed similar preferences. Older age groups instead stressed the importance of an elevator, single-storey housing, and a good design for independent living; preferences that have similarities to those expressed by individuals living in large cities and smaller urban centres where such housing is more readily available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
late-adulthood, older people, housing preferences, geography, area type, self-congruity, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153054DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X18000259OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-153054DiVA, id: diva2:1182965
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-09-04

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