Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bank Identity: Banks, ID Cards, and the Emergence of a Financial Identification Society in Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7194-5533
2018 (English)In: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today nearly the entire adult population in Sweden uses a digital BankID for more purposes than only financial ones. Issuing identity documents is commonly perceived as a task for state authorities, but in Swedish society banks have played a dominant role as identificators. The first contribution of this article is that it explains this unique emergence of bank identity and traces the historical roots of a financial identification society to the mid-1960s. Banks started issuing standardized identity cards as a complement to the new system of paying salaries and wages by direct deposit to checking accounts, and these cards eventually became quasi-official identity documents. The Swedish story thus contrasts the scholarship on identification and state control. By treating identity as both a socio-cultural category and a materialization of a technology of control, I argue that the formalization of official identity documents for everyday use was intertwined with the creation of new financial identities. The introduction and general distribution of ID cards were parts of a process whereby wage earners became financial consumers, and the banks transformed themselves into retail companies. My second contribution therefore relates to the scholarly narrative on the financialization of everyday life since the 1980s. While the mass move to financial identification in Sweden, highlighted in this article, certainly fits the content of this narrative, it questions its chronology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018.
Keywords [en]
ID cards, financial identity, banks, consumer banking, cheque accounts, twentieth-century Europe
National Category
Social Sciences Economics and Business Economic History Cultural Studies History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340725DOI: 10.1017/eso.2017.43OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-340725DiVA, id: diva2:1179604
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-01342Available from: 2018-02-01 Created: 2018-02-01 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Husz Bank Identity in Enterprise&Society (2018)(686 kB)11 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 686 kBChecksum SHA-512
dbf5f58a7e23eb3ee27c49207264854172351a11d1a5a3b7404e243cca184904b0f4518b54cdf512cabe30fcf241f7513754eb8faaf0fd82358d86f5d67e2971
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Husz, Orsi
By organisation
Department of Economic History
In the same journal
Enterprise & society
Social SciencesEconomics and BusinessEconomic HistoryCultural StudiesHistory

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 11 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 54 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf