Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Forced to develop?: A cross-sectional study on how coalition size, security costs and natural resource endowments correlate with education investments
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to measure the relationship between systemic vulnerability and government development investments. Systemic vulnerability is a concept introduced by Doner et al. (2005), which suggests that broad coalitions, severe external threats and scarce resources will lead to developmental states. Developmental states have several definitions that can generally be divided into structural and ideological features. Structural features include aspects related to state capacity and bureaucratic robustness, while ideological features refer to a stated goal of development. However, the term “developmental state” is also used as a political buzzword, which has diluted the academic concept. Education investments are used as a proxy for development investments because of the long-term societal and economic benefits that education has in a society. The study combines theories of political behavior, state-building and rentier states for the argument that systemic vulnerability should be positively correlated with education investments. Analysis is based on data from 73 countries and it shows that only some components of systemic vulnerability are correlated with education investments. The weak relationship between scarce resources and education investment follows the expected trend, while the relationship between external threat and education investment is unexpectedly negative. The broad coalitions show no statistically significant correlation between coalition size and education investment. These findings make a contribution to the field of development studies by expanding the understanding of the impact that systemic vulnerability has on development, since there has not been a large-n test of the concept on development investments before. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 37
Keyword [en]
systemic vulnerability, education, natural resources, coalitions, military expenditure, public goods, government investments
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339183OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-339183DiVA, id: diva2:1175020
Subject / course
Development Studies
Educational program
Bachelor Programme in Peace and Development Studies
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(774 kB)6 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 774 kBChecksum SHA-512
c2ba70e1b0ac0053e5e211cc37e3f0d4e13fa8fc46ef6a6945ca464608e415f0ba87c04242612abeed599db8edcad5ac2e322a26f3754f84fe14aa5bc97119b1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Government
Globalisation Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 6 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf